Anchor dad gets videobombed 2.0. Internet cannot stop laughing

Zafar Jaspal's kid barging in on his live interview

Zafar Jaspal’s kid barging in on his live interview

Remember the Robert E Kelly or BBC dad, who became an internet sensation after his kids barged into his room during a live interview.

It was one of the funniest videos of 2017 and was so widely circulated that Professor Robert E Kelly became the BBC Dad.

In fact, Professor Kelly and his family made it to the social media Hall of Fame after his kids hilarious antics.

Well, it’s a new year, and there is a brand new dad on a new channel and he is giving an even more hilarious reaction to his kid.

[“source=forbes]

Collaborating to transform healthcare’s frontline

As the nation celebrates the 70th year of the NHS and all that it has achieved, there has also been focus on its long-term sustainability and what the future might hold. There’s no denying that there continues to be a spotlight on the increasing pressure on hospitals, particularly as
we enter the winter period.

The government has announced increases in NHS funding over five years, beginning in 2019/20, with the NHS tasked with contributing to a ten-year plan for how this funding will be used.

Like most NHS Trusts, we are always on the lookout for ways to improve patient outcomes and productivity without driving higher costs. When our orthopaedic product tender came up for renewal, we saw the opportunity to do things differently. We wanted to find a solution that supported our mission to transform the service provided to patients and improve pathways to care through innovation.

Defining the objectives of the partnership

In short, we set out to find an external partner that would help us do a number of things, such as improving patient outcomes whilst reducing time spent in hospital; releasing capacity in our orthopaedic theatres; increasing the Trust’s income by improving patient throughput; optimising the patient pathway through raising the standard of clinical practice; and achieving good value in procurement by innovating in the way we undertake commercial partnerships.

When Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies (JJMDC) put in its tender, which included the value-based CareAdvantage offering, we were really pleased as we felt that this matched what we were setting out to achieve.

Diagnostic and goal-setting

A dedicated team was put on-site to work with us and, following an extensive diagnostic exercise to identify areas of improvement, a number of plans and ways of working were put in place to help us meet our objectives of delivering increased utilisation of hospital resources, specifically via:

[“source=forbes]

After MSME, Govt will flag real-estate sector stress to RBI

After MSME, Govt will flag real-estate sector stress to RBI

After red-flagging shrinking credit to Medium, Small and Micro Enterprises (MSME), the government is likely to underline — at the RBI’s Central Board meeting on December 14 — the stress in the real estate sector that threatens job losses. And make a strong pitch for providing liquidity to non-banking financial companies (NBFCs).

Over the last 3-4 years, as banks exercised extreme caution in lending, it was NBFCs that stepped in to provide loans not just to retail home buyers but also housing firms. Several real estate companies have knocked on the government’s door with the RBI refusing to entertain any special dispensation for a particular sector.  “The real estate sector is in a mess with developers finding it tough to raise funds and being forced to stall development and cut their workforce. RBI can always find ways beyond opening a special window, which it feels creates a moral hazard,” said a government official.

The RBI data on sectoral deployment of funds shows that while the commercial real estate (CRE) witnessed significant slowdown in bank credit availability post-demonetisation, the credit outstanding for CRE witnessed a contraction for the first time in 13 months. In September, it contracted 0.8 per cent over the same period last year. CRE comprises loans extended to builders for construction of housing buildings, hotels, shopping malls, industrial parks, office blocks and hospitals — classified as commercial real estate by RBI.
Getamber Anand, chairman, Confederation of Real Estate Developers’ Associations of India (CREDAI) and CMD ATS Infrastructure, said that the key issue facing developers is of last-mile funding and if it is not solved it will have a domino effect on the economy and on home buyers. He said that RBI needs to push banks to start lending to the real estate sector.

The September figure holds relevance as it coincides with the IL&FS default that created a liquidity crisis in the financial market. In July and August, however, bank credit outstanding to CRE grew by 2.4 per cent and 6.3 per cent respectively. It is important to note that the bank credit outstanding to CRE in the calendar years 2013 and 2014 grew in excess of 15 per cent every month. Since demonetisation, the credit outstanding to CRE has not witnessed a double-digit growth in any month

[“source=marketingweek]

Digitas names regional creative leaders

Matt Cullen & Gary Tranter

In case you missed it, Digitas reverted to its original name this week, keeping the unicorn but dropping the LBi after 5 years.

Kingsley Taylor, formerly MD of Organic San Francisco, also assumed the same role at the network’s Bay Area office.

Now the shop has promoted Mike Frease to EVP, ECD in Chicago, where he had been SVP, GCD. At the same time, Morgan Carroll’s role has evolved from managing director, ECD to MD and executive creative chair.

The two will lead the creative team in Chicago moving forward.

“Mike has partnered with our clients to create iconic and award-winning campaigns. The results have been extraordinary—our Gold Lions, Pencils, Effies, and Grands Prix are proof of that,” said Carroll, who got promoted in summer of 2016. “More importantly, the work has embodied our commitment to combine creativity, technology, and data in ways that no other agency can.”

Frease had formerly led the agency’s work for Whirlpool, including the Maytag, KitchenAid and Jenn-Air brands. He joined the agency in 2014 after holding top roles at other Chicago shops including Leo Burnett, JWT and FCB.

The client’s “Care Counts” campaign won 38 medals at Cannes last year, and it also scored Adweek’s top honors for creative innovation.

[“Source-campaignasia”]

Family Office Leaders are Eager for Insights

Family Office Leaders are Eager for Insights

Single-family offices serving the financial and wealth management interests of rich families have become a growing force in global markets as wealth has boomed.

In the last 10 years, the number of single-family offices managing wealth management, investing and philanthropic needs for families with at least $200 million has doubled to as many as 15,000, according to Citi Private Bank. Yet little is known about how many of these offices—managing several trillion dollars of assets—operate. Even executives who run single-family offices are often in the dark about what their peers do.

But unlike the past, these execs are not as worried about privacy and confidentiality—they want to reach out and learn from other family offices. They view their role as more as an emissary for the families they serve, rather than a “gatekeeper,” keeping other outside experts at bay, says Stephen Campbell, chairman of Citi Private Bank’s global family office group, and the former chief investment officer of a large Seattle-based family office.

One way the veil can be lifted is by getting family office executives together, which private banks and wealth managers that serve them as advisors and bankers, try to do. In fact, many single-family office practitioners, once happy to work alone, are now eager for insights they can gain from their peers and will seek out opportunities to network with the right people, Campbell says.

“We’ve seen a significant pick up in interest in (learning) what’s working, what’s not working and how they can learn from the mistakes of others,” he says.

A familiar adage in financial services is that, “if you’ve seen one family office, you’ve seen one family office,” meaning, no two are alike. But the truth is, the operations of most family offices are very much the same, he says. Most of them have to manage investment portfolios, estate planning and philanthropy, as well as paying bills and handling legal affairs.

“Where they differ is in areas of culture and values, and in the governance biases and practices of the family,” he says.

Campbell’s insights are well-founded: Citi works with 1,100 family offices, most of them serving a single family. Most also use Citi as their primary bank, he says.

How families communicate with the offices that run their wealth management needs is one area that can differ wildly. One of the families Citi works with, for example, established a family office in a separate jurisdiction from where they lived, a practice that can provide tax advantages. The office was set up nine years ago with a staff to run it, but as of today, no one in the family has ever been there, Campbell says.

At the other extreme, a principal member of another family that works with Citi goes into his family office every Thursday, sometimes with other family members, and they cook a meal together with the staff. “Oddly enough, those are both models that work,” he says.

Citi has found families are willing to share what’s worked for them on a range of topics if they can exchange ideas with families of a similar wealth level and degree of sophistication. Two years ago, the private bank began a “family office leadership program” in New York, which includes 125 family-office executives serving the world’s “most affluent families,” Campbell says. The event has now spread to programs in Hong Kong and Dubai, and elsewhere to accommodate demand.

Because it’s difficult to cover all the topics families want to discuss, Citi is now rolling out a series of articles and white papers on nitty-gritty topics, like, “why family offices are increasingly relying upon bespoke remuneration packages to attract top executive talent” and “how grooming tomorrow’s family leaders can help preserve family wealth and influence and prevent discord in the family.”

There are a lot of “how-to” manuals on how to set up and run a family office, Campbell says, but “the nuance is in how and when to apply these concepts, and that’s what we’re tackling with these articles.”

[“Source-barrons”]

A quirky workspace for a creative workforce at Wieden+Kennedy’s

Pichwai-style illustrations of Wieden+Kennedy staff by artist Mahendra Kumar. Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint.

Pichwai-style illustrations of Wieden+Kennedy staff by artist Mahendra Kumar. Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

Wearing a bright maroon printed dress and white Nikes, Sarina Grewal, 25, looks extremely comfortable sitting on the carpet in her office, talking animatedly to her colleague, Akhil Thakur, about a new design they are working on. Grewal and Thakur can often be found working together in the library area—even if it means sitting on the floor—to escape the noise and chatter near their desks. This jells well with the casual comfort vibe of Wieden+Kennedy’s (W+K’s) Delhi office. “I joined right after college because I didn’t want to waste time. This place made me want to stick around. It has been three years already!” says Grewal, an art director at the creative agency.

The mascot : The vibrant office in Saket, Delhi, is quite a hit. “I have often seen random people walking past and pointing out to the red horse at the entrance of our office. As a matter of fact, the red horse is the most popular selfie destination too,” she laughs. It has turned into a sort of mascot for the office, with official paraphernalia like coasters and tote bags bearing its picture.

Employees play a video game. Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

Employees play a video game. Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

This is not the only thing that makes the Delhi office stand out. On one side of the lounge is a ceiling full of illustrations. “These are all illustrations of my colleagues. When someone joins, we get their photos clicked, send it to a Pichwai artist, Mahendra Kumar in Ajmer, and get these illustrations made. It is a W+K tradition,” she says. The entrance also has a wall to showcase exemplary art/creative work by employees. For now, it also serves as a noticeboard announcing the next movie for their Thursday movie evenings.

“We have these fun things every week. Our Amsterdam office has wine Thursdays, so we decided to do movies instead. Some days we are at work till 2-3am and these things help us to de-stress,” adds Grewal.

Sarina Grewal next to a red horse that is a selfie magnet. Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

Sarina Grewal next to a red horse that is a selfie magnet. Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

The nomadic life: The W+K office is flexible about who sits where. By lunchtime, Grewal says, most people are sitting somewhere other than their usual seats, discussing projects. A round table near her work desk serves as an informal meeting space, as do couches in the lounge-cum-library area. The library is the most popular venue though, both for meetings and video-game sessions.

The studio has recently moved to the main office space. This, Grewal believes, is less alienating for the people working on the final product. The erstwhile studio is right opposite the main entrance, with a large Make In India lion standing proudly within. Make In India was one of the campaigns W+K worked on. Around the office are signs of other campaigns—posters from Nike’s last print campaign and miniature IndiGo aeroplane models.

Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

The thinking spot: The library houses magazines and books on design and art. There are a few yearbooks as well. A table next to it serves as a standing desk—its height is adjustable. There are witty posters too. One such poster declares, “Be mediocre. You will sleep better.”

“The office is always very casual. You will see us joking and laughing. But then again, everyone here is passionate about the brands they get to handle. Which makes it a wonderful place to begin your career with,” Grewal says.

Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint

The Work Tour is a series which looks at how people are engaging with office design and how it impacts their productivity and positivity at work.

[“Source-livemint”]

Being Creative Increases Your Risk Of Schizophrenia By 90 Percent

From van Gogh and Beethoven to Darwin and Plath, the number of creative geniuses that have suffered from mental health issues has long sparked the debate – is there a tie between creativity and mental health? Well, according to a new study published in The British Journal of Psychiatry there is, as creatives are more likely to suffer from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression than the rest of the population.

Previous research has often been limited due to issues like small samples sizes, however, this new study looked at the health records of the whole of Sweden – providing a sample of almost 4.5 million people. The researchers then took into account whether these people studied an artistic subject – like music or drama – at university.

Strangely enough, those with artsy degrees were 90 percent more likely to be hospitalized for schizophrenia than their less creative counterparts. The hospitalizations were most likely to happen at some point during their 30s.

What’s more, artists were 62 percent more likely to be admitted to hospital due to bipolar disorder and 39 percent more likely to go to hospital for depression. The researchers determined that it wasn’t simply the act of going to university that affected mental health, as those with law degrees did not have higher rates of these illnesses than the general population. Variables like IQ were also taken into account.

This is not the first study to find a link between mental health and creativity. For example, in 2010 brain scans revealed similarities between the thought pathways of schizophrenics and very creative people. Meanwhile, a 2015 study found that creative people have a raised risk of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, a 2012 study found that just writers are at a higher risk.

So why does this connection exist?

Well, it’s still not really clear. It could be that creative people are more likely to think deeply and be emotionally unstable, making them more vulnerable to conditions like depression. Meanwhile, bouts of productivity and high energy are linked to both creativity and bipolar disorder. Lead author James McCabe told New Scientistthat the genetics behind creativity might also influence mental health.

“Creativity often involves linking ideas or concepts in ways that other people wouldn’t think of,” he told New Scientist. “But that’s similar to how delusions work – for example, seeing a connection between the color of someone’s clothes and being part of an MI5 conspiracy.”

However, while creative people are naturally more likely to study art subjects, many creative people do not, so the new study is limited in that it used degree subject as the sole measure of creativity.

However, taking previous research into account too, there does appear to be some sort of link. Still, it’s important to remember that the rates of conditions like schizophrenia are still very low even among creative people, so if you are an artist yourself, there’s no need to worry.

[“Source-iflscience”]

Hyundai Creta facelift: What’s new?

.

Hyundai is expected to launch the updated Creta on May 22, 2018. While dealer training sessions are still underway, we’ve got our hands on a complete feature list that tells us what’s new on the upcoming Creta facelift.

What’s new on the outside?

The Creta facelift will be identifiable by its larger hexagonal grille that is in line with Hyundai’s latest styling theme. The grille, with a thick chrome surround, flows into the headlights that will carry on unchanged. The new chunky front bumper also sports creases and has separate housings for the fog lamps. Also new is a thick black chin that adds muscle to the look. At the rear, it gets a slightly redesigned bumper.

The Creta facelift will be available in both, single- and dual-tone colour options. The single tone options will include White, Passion Orange, Black, Silver, Stardust, Marina Blue and Fire Red, while dual-tone colours will include White with black, and Orange with black.

What engines and gearboxes will the Hyundai Creta facelift come with?

The refreshed Creta will continue to be sold with the 90hp, 1.4-litre diesel, the 123hp, 1.6-litre petrol and 128hp, 1.6-litre diesel engine, like the outgoing model. The 1.4 will be available solely with a manual gearbox, while the 1.6 units will continue to get the option of manual and automatic gearboxes. No mechanical changes are expected on the SUV.

The variant breakup is as follows:

  • Hyundai Creta 1.4 diesel MT: E+ and S variant
  • Hyundai Creta 1.6 petrol MT: E, E+, SX, SX (dual tone), SX(O)
  • Hyundai Creta 1.6 diesel MT: SX, SX (dual tone), SX (O)
  • Hyundai Creta 1.6 petrol AT: SX
  • Hyundai Creta 1.6 diesel AT: S, SX

What’s new on the inside? What about features?

The updated Creta will share the dashboard with the current model. However, the variants of the Creta facelift will get a rejig. Like the outgoing Creta, all variants of the facelifted model will get dual airbags and ABS as standard. The following list gives you the variant-wise feature highlights and additions on the Creta facelift.

New Hyundai Creta E

Available with only 1.6 petrol MT 123hp

  • Power windows all around
  • Driver seat height adjust (Manual)
  • 16-inch steel wheels
  • Front armrest (sliding)

New Hyundai Creta E+

Available with 1.6 petrol MT and 1.4 diesel MT

  • USB charger (petrol only)
  • Audio system with Bluetooth

New Hyundai Creta S

Available on 1.4 diesel MT and 1.6 diesel AT

  • LED daytime running lamps
  • Front USB Charger
  • Music system with Bluetooth
  • Reverse camera and parking sensors

New Hyundai Creta SX

Available with 1.6 petrol (AT and MT) and 1.6 diesel (AT and MT)

  • Shark-fin antenna
  • 17-inch alloy wheels (Automatic gearbox variants only)
  • 16-inch alloy wheels (Manual gearbox variants only)
  • Projector headlamps
  • Powered sunroof (Automatic gearbox variants only)
  • Cruise control
  • LED positioning lamps
  • LED daytime running lamps
  • Smart key
  • USB charging
  • Music system with Arkamys sound
  • Cluster ioniser
  • AVN infotainment with IPS display
  • Smartphone link
  • Hyundai Autolink feature (Automatic gearbox variants only)
  • Static bending lights
  • Isofix child seat anchors (Automatic gearbox variants only)

New Hyundai Creta SX (dual tone)

Available with 1.6 petrol MT and 1.6 diesel MT

  • Shark-fin antenna
  • 17-inch alloy wheels
  • Projector headlamps
  • Powered sunroof (Automatic gearbox variants only)
  • Cruise control
  • LED positioning lamps
  • LED daytime running lamps
  • Smart key
  • USB charging
  • Music system with Arkamys mode
  • Cluster ioniser
  • AVN infotainment with IPS display
  • Smartphone link
  • Hyundai Autolink feature (Automatic gearbox variants only)
  • Static bending lights

New Hyundai Creta SX (O)

Available with 1.6 petrol MT and 1.6 diesel MT

  • Powered sunroof
  • Six-way adjustable powered driver’s seat
  • Six airbags
  • Smart key band
  • Wireless charging support
  • ECM feature

When can I buy one?

Hyundai dealers have started accepting bookings for the updated Creta, with deliveries being promised by the end of May, depending on variant selected.

[“Source-autocarindia”]

Theresa May defeats bid to make her launch part two of Leveson inquiry

Brian Leveson wrote to the government earlier this year insisting the second phase of his inquiry should be ‘commenced as soon as possible’. Photograph: Paul Hackett/Reuters

The government has narrowly defeated a Labour bid to force it to launch the second phase of the Leveson inquiry into press behaviour.

MPs were voting on an amendment to the data protection bill tabled by the former Labour leader Ed Miliband. The government won the vote by 304 votes to 295, a majority of nine.

The Conservative manifesto for last year’s general election said Theresa May’s government would not proceed with the second stage of Leveson. During a two-hour debate on Wednesday, the culture secretary, Matt Hancock, said it would be the wrong way of tackling the most pressing questions facing the media industry.

He praised the low-cost arbitration system for victims of press intrusion set up by the Independent Press Standards Organisation). Ipso is voluntary, and not officially recognised.

“I am determined that we have a system that is strengthened so that we have recourse to justice when things go wrong,” he said. “The choice isn’t between doing something, and nothing. It is between doing something, and something better.”

Sir Brian Leveson was appointed in July 2011 in the wake of the phone-hacking scandal that led to the closure of the News of the World, and spent many months examining witnesses, ultimately reporting in November 2012.

When the inquiry was launched, a second phase was envisaged, which would cover cases under criminal investigation when phase one was carried out. Leveson wrote to the government earlier this year insisting he believed the second phase of his inquiry should be “commenced as soon as possible”. Ed Miliband attacks government’s axing of new Leveson inquiry – video

Nokia 6 (2018) 4GB model India launch set for May 13

Image result for Nokia 6 (2018) 4GB model India launch set for May 13

The 4GB RAM variant of the Nokia 6 (2018)/Nokia 6.1 is all set for launch in India later this week. Sales will open May 13, with Amazon India being the exclusive retail partner.

While there’s no confirmation on pricing yet, rumors say the model will set you back around INR 18,999 ($280). For comparison, this is INR 2,000 ($30) more than what the 3GB RAM model costs.

[“Source-gsmarena”]